Frank Miller

All posts tagged Frank Miller

This week on View from the Gutters our topic work is:

All-Star Batman and Robin, The Boy Wonder

Story by . . . . . . The Goddamn Frank Miller
Art by . . . . . . . . The Goddamn Jim Lee

From Wikipedia:

All Star Batman & Robin, the Boy Wonder is an American comic book series written by Frank Miller and penciled by Jim Lee. It was published by DC Comics, with a sporadic schedule, between 2005 and 2008… This was the first series to be launched in 2005 under DC’s All Star imprint. These series are helmed by renowned writers and artists in the American comic book industry and attempt to retell some of the history of prominent DC Universe characters, but outside of DC Universe continuity, and not be restricted by it, in order to appeal to new and returning readers. Each title under the All Star imprint is set in its own continuity and separate universe. According to Miller, the series takes place in the same universe as The Dark Knight Returns.

Brant says:

The goddamn hosts of this goddamn podcast try to figure out what the hell is going on with this goddamn comic…I’ll stop now. We, like so many before us, struggle to reconcile the craziness of this story and fit it in its time and place in an attempt to understand what really cannot be understood. I go on a sort of strange rant about Marvel fanboys. Much like the comic we read, this episode is sure to leave most wondering what the hell they just experienced.

Our hosts for this episode are Brant Eddy, Joe Preti, Kenny “Coach” Wisdom and Tobiah Panshin. On our next episode we will be reading Monstress.

A special thank you to our Patreon sponsors for this month: Tony Queretaro, Chris Bianculli, Bryan May, Addison Appleby, and Kerfy Gonzo.

This week on View from the Gutters our topic work is:

Daredevil: Love and War

Story by . . . . . . Frank Miller
Art by . . . . . . . . Bill Sienkiewicz

From Goodreads:

Daredevil: Love and War, in which the notorious Kingpin of Crime must rescue his own wife from the clutches of extortionists.

Brant Says:

I love the terseness of the blurbs for this book. Considered by many to be one of the great hidden gems of Miller’s Daredevil work, this is a book that features a lot less Daredevil than one might expect but helps to serve as a defining work for the Kingpin. I miss this one due to illness but our intrepid hosts discuss the book in depth and tear into the problematic Miller onion and some of his issues with women, men, superheroes, and so on and how he serves as a source for modern stories and how the critique of that works is also used to source modern stories.

Our hosts for this episode are Kit DeForge, Joe Preti, Kayleigh Fleeman, Adam Panshin and Tobiah Panshin. On our next episode we will be reading Pedro & Me.

A special thank you to our Patreon sponsors for this month: Tony Queretaro, Chris Bianculli, Bryan May, Becca Levendowski, Addison Appleby, and Kerfy Gonzo.

This week on View from the Gutters our topic work is Daredevil: The Man Without Fear, by Frank Miller and John Romita, Jr. Published in 1994, The Man Without Fear explores and revises the origin of Daredevil—and by extension the origins of Elektra and The Kingpin.

If you’re familiar with Frank Miller’s other works you have an idea of what you’re getting into with this book, which was written contemporaneously with Miller’s Sin City. Similarly, this book is an excellent sample of John Romita, Jr’s art, which—love it or hate it—is at it’s peak in this book.

In our recommendation section, our hosts nominated Superman: Red Son, iZombie, Alabaster Wolves, Harbinger, and Umbral for discussion on the next episode, and our selected title is Umbral, Vol. 1 & 2.

Our hosts for this episode are Andrew Chard, Tobiah Panshin, Joe Preti, Kayleigh Fleeman, and Brant Gillihan-Eddy.

darkknight

On this giant-sized episode of View from the Gutters our topic work is Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, written and penciled by Frank Miller, with inks by Klaus Janson and colors by Lynn Varley. The Dark Knight Returns is one of the seminal Batman works, and along with Year One (released the following year, also written by Miller) not only helped redefine Batman in the post-Silver Age period but also inspired a generation of comic creators. It is credited as one of the books that ended the Silver Age itself, along with Watchmen and Crisis on Infinite Earths.

In The Dark Knight Returns we find a 55-year old Bruce Wayne, retired from his Batman persona, struggling to find meaning in his life without the crusade. Shortly after the book begins Wayne puts on the Batman again for the first time in years, once again trying to save a Gotham City on the brink of anarchy, but this time struggling not just against criminality gone rampant, not just against the police, but against his own mortality.

The Dark Knight Returns is a dark and violent book, which demonstrates Miller’s brilliance as a writer and artist, as well as many of his worst flaws—not least of which is the pervasive undertone of misogyny which permeates so much of Miller’s work. This is a very conflicted piece of work, but it’s also critical to understanding the evolution both of Batman as a character and superheroes as a genre.

In our recommendation section, our hosts nominated Heck; The Red Wing; The Hedge Knight, Vol. 1 & 2; and The Superior Spider-Man #1-31, for discussion on the next episode, and our selected title is The Superior Spider-Man #1-31.

Our hosts for this episode were Andrew Chard, Joe Preti, Tobiah Panshin, and Cade Reynolds.